“10 Steps to Story Structure” with Your Lie in April

10 Lies of April Structure 2

Over a year ago, I tried explaining the three-act structure using the anime Your Lie in April, but felt that I didn’t do a decent job at that. And now I’m tackling the writing about writing thing by diving into the ten distinct moments that a story needs. This came from 5 Secrets of Story Structure by K.M. Weiland, available on Amazon’s Kindle for the low, low price of zero. So to illustrate these moments, and strengthen my understanding of them, I’m using Your Lie in April once more.

Needless to say, I’m spoiling the hell out of Your Lie in April. If you have even the smallest interest in watching it (which I highly recommend), hold off.

Continue reading

Advertisements

Story Structure with Your Lie in April

Two weeks ago, I made a long, rambling post explaining the two “points of no return” used in fiction for the 3-act structure, along with the mid-point moment of self-reflection, the “mirror moment.”

If you missed that article or want a refresher, you’re able to find that post here.

What I want to do with this post is to further dive into these three key moments using Your Lie in April, an excellent graphic novel-turned-anime by Naoshi Arakawa. This story centers around Kousei Arima, a fourteen-year-old piano prodigy who gave up playing two years prior after the death of his mother. Since then, he’s been unable to hear the piano and he views life in dull grays, an existence he’s content with.

Continue reading